Melancholia

Melancholia, San Vito al Tagliamento Castle, exhibition view
Melancholia, San Vito al Tagliamento Castle, exhibition view
Faded garden (Capitol),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Capitol),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Putto),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Putto),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Head),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Head),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Mask),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
Faded garden (Mask),2018. Photographic emulsion on sculpture
10 Parsec, 2018. Lambda print on duratrans, neon, iroin, variable dimensions
10 Parsec, 2018. Lambda print on duratrans, neon, iroin, variable dimensions
Melancholia, San Vito al Tagliamento Castle, exhibition view
Melancholia, San Vito al Tagliamento Castle, exhibition view
2018
San Vito al Tagliamento Castle
Melancholia







The title - Melancholia - is a clear tribute to Lars von Trier's 2011 homonymous movie. As a matter of fact, Melancholia is the fictional name of a huge planet that, at the end of von Trier's movie, collides with the Earth, sentencing it to its final destruction and the inevitable extinction of mankind. With this quote, the exhibition leaves the audience in no doubt about what it is and what it intends to be: an invitation to keep in mind - and accept - how precarious and ephemeral our lives really are, whether individual or collective. The universe and the space are thus presented to us as home to that powerful unknown that, within its sublime romantic instance, attracts and frightens us all at the same time.
An atmosphere of suspension and apprehension surfaces from this sort of posthumous landscape, where humankind has now vanished and is only vaguely recalled by fragments of fallen statues, just as "fallen" to the ground is also a solid and dark piece of sky, collapsed under the shakiness and failure of the usual magnetic field of our atmosphere. In a process of spatial and architectural breach, the artist leads us into a garden that, unlike common practice, we visit at night and not during the day. The park - a central theme recurring as well in Melancholia - is therefore the place where Man and Nature coexist in a more or less equal and peaceful relationship. In a post-catastrophe context, such as the one described here, the absence of human beings gives way, nonetheless, to the natural element, which starts growing again, slowly and yet inevitably, taking back all those artificial places that had previously almost exclusively belonged to humans.
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SILVIA MARIOTTI

Lives and works in Milan (IT)

 

 

Education – workshop – residency

 

 

Awards

 

 

Selected solo show

 

 

Selected group show

 

 

Special projects

 

 

Publications

 

 

Interviews, reviews